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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 783 (some duplicates have been removed)
of. >> reporter: youssif and his family didn't dare travel far in baghdad. light many parents, youssif's mother and father kept him close to home in hopes of keeping him safe. on january 15th, a monday, youssif was just outside the front door eating chips and playing. his father was at work. his mother was inside their small home. >> reporter: youssif's father took youssif here to this hospital. doctors at the baghdad hospital scraped the dead skin from youssif's face with no anesthetic, an incredibly painful process. when youssif returned home after 20 days, he was a different child and not just because of the scarring across much of his young face. >> reporter: months after the attack, youssif stood in the spot where he was burned. he said three masked men poured gasoline on him and then set him on fire. i was burned, youssif says. >> reporter: youssif now spent his days inside his baghdad home, playing computer games. j youssif told his mother that his friends shunned him. >> reporter: once out going, energetic and happy, youssif was not withdrawn, sullen, angry. she descri
i'm keith olbermann. good night and good luck. live from baghdad, here is rachel maddow. good evening and morning, rachel. good evening and morning, rachel. >> good evening and morning to you as well, keith. thanks very much. thanks to you at home for staying with us for the next hour. we are coming to you live from a u.s. military base inside the international zone, akr, the green zone here in baghdad. after nearly 7 1/2 years of war here, the united states combat mission in iraq for all intents and purposes is over. there will be a handover at the end of the month. and about 2,500 more troops will leave here this month. but the last combat battalion of the last combat brigade is gone. if you were with us last night on msnbc, you saw those breathtaking images of the final u.s. combat brigade crossing the iraqi border into kuwait. >> reporter: is this the end of the war? >> it's the end of "operation iraqi freedom." it is the end of war as we have come to know it as american soldiers and as america. our brigade is the last combat brigade in iraq. this is a symbolic image of th
of the deepwater horizon disaster in the gulf. the rachel maddow show from baghdad is next. i'm keith olbermann. good night and good luck. >>> the combat mission in iraq is over. as of the end of this month iraqi freedom ends and a new mission begins. oif. i keep remembering since i've been here the old urban myth i think it was about the original name for the war here being proposed as operation iraqi liberation. that of course was a problem because if it was operation iraqi liberation instead of wearing oif insignia everyone in the military would be wearing patches that said oil on them. and that of course would be awkward. when george w. bush's father invaded iraq in 1991 saddam set the oil fields on fire. they were ready for that this time around when bush the son invaded but it didn't happen at least to the same extent. oil accounts for 95% of iraq's income. iraq is sitting on the world's second largest oil reserves but for a country that is afloat on a sea of oil, a sea of energy, the defining feature of life here, at least at this time of year, is a lack of power, a lack of electricity.
was talking about, abu ghraib, among the worst places in baghdad. what was it like now? what is it like now how do you feel about what you have been through? this war has bracketed the military's experience and your life. how much has changed? >> i feel like the country has a lot more respect. i believe they can handle themselves. >> the iraqis. >> yes. the ips. >> the iraqi army, the iraqi police. >> yes. from 2007 if you look at them then and now it is like day and night. totally different. >> much more violent then? >> yes. >> is that what you mean? >> yes. >> now the iraqi army and police, they can handle their situations unlike they did in 2007. i believe they can hold their own without the american support now. >> now, a lot of people are worried that iraq is still relatively unstable, there is a political situation. are you worried that the country could deteriorate and your achievements could be undercut if the country goes back into a violent state? is that something that soldiers discuss or any of you are particularly worried about? >> me particularly, no. i mean, i can't speak fo
of baghdad. the violence is a major crisis for iraqi security. >> terrorists attacked the all too familiar in iraq. 13 last within just a few hours is extreme, even for this war- torn country -- 13 blast. a suicide bomber killed at least 14 people and wounded dozens more at a police station in baghdad. the deadliest attack occurred in qud, southeast of baghdad. here, too, a suicide bomber blew off the side of a vehicle outside a police station. authorities say 20 police officers died and around 90 were wounded. insurgents also targeted government security forces in basrah, kirkuk and other cities in what appears to have been a coordinated terrorist campaign. the onslaught comes amid the final withdrawal of u.s. combat troops. authorities say the bombers seek to show that iraqi security is not up to the task. >> earlier, i spoke to our "new york times" corresponded and asked, given the scale of the attacks, what are the coalition and iraqi security officials saying about iraq's ability to deal with the security situation in the country? >> it is clearly demoralizing for the iraqi security f
potential iraqi recruits blown up by a suicide bomber in baghdad. the tragic tale and death of an iranian student told by pictures smuggled out of the country. so, is nowhere is safe for the rhino? south africa sees a surge in coachinpoaching. >> hello and welcome to gmt. the clamor for funding has been heard from one source at least. world bank has committed the $900 million to pakistan. the countries of high commissioner in britain says the cost of reconstruction could cost as much as $15 billion. >> yes, and such is the nature of this crisis that is carrying out all kinds of missions at the same time. this is still a rescue mission. some parts of the country are still cut off, only accessible by helicopters. there are not enough helicopters in the air. the united nations has said 6 million people are in need of food, water, shelter, and medical care, but only a fraction are receiving it. attention is already turning to the long-term cost of reconstruction. how to put a country back together again when it has lost so many bridges and roads? we are going to take a look at the economic si
national youth orchestra just performed [unintelligible] our baghdad correspondent went to watch and listen. >> 42 musicians from all over the country, performing in iraq decomposition in baghdad. it is a bittersweet peace reflecting the mood swings of the beleaguered capital. the conductor is from scotland. this is partly funded by the kurdistan regional government and counsel. it was created by a young baghdad music student. >> i've got an opportunity to campaign for something i believed in. just like that. >> this is an amazing achievement for a 19-year-old iraqi student. it is moving and it is not in baghdad and that is a dream. >> it is hard to be thinking there are are -- [unintelligible] hopefully baghdad will be safe maybe next year. i need to be safe. >> the main challenge was choosing the musicians. >> many of them don't have access to the quality of teachers we do here. many of them have never played in any form of group at all. >> many of them did not have access to unstable baghdad. so they auditioned on utube. ♪ they also play [inaudible] music, messenger of peace in a troub
. they head out in darkness. the soldiers have just left camp liberty in baghdad. it's about 2:00 in the morning. they will be driving for seven hours in the night, then take a break before pushing on to the border. the troops scan the roads, but it's mostly a precaution. the threat of attack is considered low. sunrise comes early here, just 5:00 a.m. they have been driving through the night. daylight gives us our first clear view of the road. the strykers are traveling on iraq's main north-south highway -- smooth, wide blacktop. what a difference to how american troops entered iraq. in 2003, american forces crashed through the desert to stay unpredictable to the iraqi army. also different today, the helicopters over the convoy aren't there to provide overwatch. they're carrying reporters, flying low to take pictures. our own video is broadcast by a satellite truck we affectionately call the bloom mobile. >> because it's an armored vehicle -- >> reporter: it was named after nbc correspondent david bloom. in 2003 bloom used it to do the first live television reports ever from a
composition in baghdad. if it is a bittersweet peace reflecting the mood swings of iraq possibly later capital. believe third -- their capital. it is partly funded by the british council. it was created by a young baghdad music student. >> i was given an opportunity to campaign for something i believe in. the opportunity pop up just like that. ♪ >> this is an amazing achievement for a 19-year-old student. it is a success and is moving, but it is not in baghdad. that is the dream. >> is kind of hard thinking there are two places in iraq were one is safe and the other is not. hopefully baghdad will be saved next year. -- will be safe. >> the main challenge was choosing the musicians. >> many of them are a self- taught. many don't have access to the quality of teachers we can bring here. many have never played in any form of group at all. >> many of them did not have access to unstable baghdad. they auditioned on youtube. ♪ they also play [unintelligible] music that is a messenger of peace in a troubled land. [applause] >> immigration officials in canada have begun processing several
in baghdad, but first, our world affairs correspondent. >> the target some of the integrated blasts, iraqi security forces. the timing, almost certainly link to the announcement on tuesday that it military -- that the troop numbers reduction are in line. perpetrators and not known as yet. no organization has said it carried out the attacks, but the finger of blame is pointed at al qaeda-linked insurgents. explosions all across iraq. in bosnia, a car exploded as police were telling it out of it parking lot -- in basra. the deadliest in baghdad, a number of car explosions. and in another city suicide bombers killed and injured. kirk cook, a car bomb. fallujah, vermont 8 where a bomb was detonated near to a police station. and in karbala where a suicide bomber attacked a police checkpoint. seven and a half years after the invasion of iraq by the united states-led coalition u.s. troops have been steadily leaving the country over the past few weeks. there are now fewer than 50,000 stations in iraq. it was widely anticipated that their departure and the handover of security to get iraqi forces w
much of the last eight years. he's with us from baghdad for a closer look at the fragile state of things, again, after seven or so years of war. richard, i talked to you today and you had the rare distinction of hearing the president's speech from baghdad. what is the state of life there these days? >> reporter: many people here don't share the same kind of optimism that was expressed not only by the president but by analysts across the united states today. life in baghdad right now is very difficult. this is not what you could consider a normal or a stable city. just coming in from the airport this morning and driving to our bureau, it's about a 12-mile journey along a short stretch of road. we had to pass through six different checkpoints. there is a curfew in place tonight, as there is every single night. that gives you an idea of how much stability there is here -- not very much at all. also, iraqis only have about three hours of power every single day. they had 24 hours of power here in baghdad under saddam hussein. while the united states may want to close the door on the
: and margaret warner in baghdad examines the challenges iraqis still face in their daily lives. >> woodruff: then, from mexico city, we learn the latest on the arrest of an alleged drug lord from jason beaubien of npr. >> lerher: we have another in john merrow's reports on the washington, d.c., schools. tonight he looks at a new test for teachers. >> how can you possibly have a system where the vast majority of adults are running around thinking i'm doing an excellent job when what we're producing for kids is 8% success. >> woodruff: and jeffrey brown updates the story of new orleans musician and scholar michael white, five years after katrina. >> i went through a serious period of depression, of anger, of many different kinds of emotions. ♪ and then i came to realize the most valuable thing that i have i never lost. it's inside. it's that music tradition. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for
harris reporting from baghdad tonight. >>> was it a hate crime? a fire at the site of a planned islamic center. in the heart of the bible belt. >>> and, miracle on the tracks. a woman falls into the path of a racing subway train. how did she survive? >>> good evening. tonight, across the gulf coast, they're marking five years since katrina. there were powerful images today. in new orleans, they prayed along a rebuilt levee. in st. bernard parish, they sent a wreath into the sea. and in mississippi, they read names etched into that wall. president obama traveled to the gulf, and we'll have his words in a moment. but we begin tonight by asking -- how much has changed? it was five years ago this morning. katrina made landfall. and inside the superdome, where thousands of evacuees sat in those stadium seats, the roof began to tear off. all we had was our cell phone to call out. massive waterfall in the center of the superdome. no one knew that surviving the superdome and the convention center would be even more challenging than surviving the storm itself. we remember jean brown, desperate t
in our history. cairo, baghdad, that is the arab civilization. that is where mathematics were advanced. that is where a lot of things related to construction, learning, and things like that. to come and get tanks into it -- this time, it was not something we read in the book when baghdad was destroyed several times during the invasion. writers and cameras were going with all of the legion's attacking back debt. -- attacking baghdad. >> that image must of been devastating. is there any question in your mind that the arab world wants peace between palestine and israel? >> i have no question in my mind that the majority in the arab world want peace. i must tell you, we have french, we have radicals, we have people who think that the creation of the state of israel was a bad idea from the beginning. however, i must say that the majority now think that the conflict is really leading the region, is taking a lot of the attention of the leaders. we either get to the contemporary world or we do not. that is taking a lot of that tension from students. it is also leading in lot of emotions, a lot
to take on the government in baghdad, will we stay out of it? will we stand down and say this is their fight at this point forward? >> this is iraq's future to construct. chris to, a point you made earlier, we have to recognize that while there is not a new government in place yet, we've seen for five months a process after the election, by the same token, there's real politics going on in iraq. some elements have tried to re-create the se sectarian viole and the iraqis are having none of it. this process is taking longer than we would like. we'd like to see them move forward. we think they will in the coming weeks. there is democracy happening in iraq. it is a much more stable place than it was a couple years. >> stand by for a second. we want to alert viewers who might be joining us. what you're seeing at this hour, extraordinary developments were revealed to the american public in the last 32 minutes and as you see on the screen, the last combat troops are leaving iraq. that division there from the actual troop convoy, 440 u.s. personnel, the 4th stryker brigade headin
from the green zone again in baghdad. >> rachel thank you and think you for joining us for this night and broadcast. one of the things that i have done since i have been here is spend some time with iraqi police. i have decided that what i would least like to be right now in iraq is an iraqi police officer. they are at the very sharp and of the spirit and terms of the insurgency. police officers being killed. bodies being burned after they have been shot to death. the flag of insurgent groups being hoisted over the sight of police shootings. not to mention that if they were not being targeted right now, it is a massive force with a hard job. is the state department capable of taking over the iraqi police training job from the department of defense? state's but it pales compared to the department of defense budget, and i don't know that the state department has the personnel on staff to do the huge job that is iraqi police training. i wonder if this is going to mean a massive reliance on private for-profit contractors in order to get that done. >> first of all, we do law enforcement tr
coverage will continue live from richard engel's robing position and from baghdad and washington and here at our anchor desk in new york. i'll be joined by rachel maddow who was in the green zone in baghdad along with chris matthews, lawrence o'donnell, gene robin, so colonel jack jacobs and many others. we will commence our coverage before all of that analysis and continuing reports with the first of richard engel's live reports from the convoy. a report made to brian williams on "nbc nightly news" which we will now be smul casting till the conclusion of richard engel's transmission from the desert. then i'll rejoin you and we'll get back to richard. here now is brian williams. >> troops are pulling out of iraq. it's been about 7 1/2 years since that first late night air strike decimated is the iraqi government and lit up american television screens. saddam hussein is now dead. the new iraqi government is still taking tentative steps. and the toll on the united states has been substantial. 4,415 american service members died in iraq. close to 32,000 americans wounded. we watched the inva
in pakistan. president obama describes the latest violence in baghdad. hostage drama at the drama the -- embassy in israel. and hthe detonations is concernd that many of the millions of people affected by the floods -- the u.n. is concerned that many of the millions of people affected by the floods and pakistan have yet to receive any help at all. lost bridges are hampering efforts to get aid to the region. the world bank has promised pakistan a loan of more than $900 million. >> getting aid to the flood victims is getting to be a serious problem. the relief supplies are not readily available. in this province, the disaster first became evident in a reminder of how destructive the floods can be. >> the government must help us out by providing food. with bridges across the river in the west, boats are used to ferry supplies between villages. unemployment is becoming common. there is no one to look after your needs. in the put job province, a school has been turned into a shelter for pregnant women. -- in this province, a school has been turned into a shelter. seeing this that conti
taking you back seven years to the very moment combat started and the first bombs fell on baghdad. >> shock and awe. >>> today marks a new beginning in iraq. the last u.s. combat brigade pulled out of the country and american troops begin their official transition to assist and advise iraqi forces. right now there are 56,000 u.s. troops still in iraq. that number will be drawn down to 50,000 by the end of the month. the u.s. combat mission will officially end on september 1st. that's when the first system new dawn will officially begin. many u.s. troops leave iraq with bittersweet emotions. insome lost comrades and many witnessed the horrors of war. and almost all say that they are changed forever. >> make sure you have your i.d. cards on hand, too. >> reporter: these are 24-year-old sergeant's final hours in iraq. last minute check and laughter. relief at having survived and finally going home. he's part of the last u.s. combat brigade to convoy out of iraq. as america dials back the war 20 advise and assist mission with 50,000 troops. after two tours in iraq, he says he feels li
news overnight. extreme violence rocks baghdad. dozens are killed. >>> and he's known for many talents, including his voice. but now actor michael douglas, risks losing just that. >>> good morning. well, it is enough to give hope to anyone with a fear of flying. nearly everyone survived this crash of a boeing 737 on a dare bean island, including all of the americans onboard. >> two of them will be air-lifted to hospitals today, as a team from washington, d.c. helps in the ongoing investigation. >> as john hendren explains, weather on the san andreas island at the time could be to blame. >> reporter: it looks like the catastrophe of colombia. a boeing 737 jetliner, shattered in three pieces, littering the runway. >> the wing was covered with fuel. and i was concerned. have an explosion, we will die. i just started praying. >> reporter: they're calling it the miracle of san an degrees island. somehow of the passengers onboard, only one did not survive, a woman who had a heart attack after the crash. carolina bolino of georgia, was among the survivors. >> i remember the flight attendant s
. >> a suicide attack in baghdad this week. iraq's army commander once the americans to stay another 10 years. iraq cannot cope alone, he says. president obama says that all american troops will be out of iraq by the end of next year. many will end up in afghanistan. the iraq conflict is not exactly over. al qaeda is getting stronger. sunni militants are threatening to rejoin the insurgency. the united states will still help the iraqi government, but as one u.s. officer said, this is no longer america's war. >>> reports suggest the state department and the u.s. is close to announcing the launch of direct peace talks with israel and palestinians. this is after months of indirect talks. the last substantive negotiations were nine years ago. the details are still being worked out. >>> organizers of the commonwealth games in delhi have suffered two blows, two big firms withdrawing their sponsorship because of corruption allegations, and an australian swimmer has advised countrymen to stay away from the event. >>> the american muslim leader behind plans to build a center near the 9/11 attacks has
iraq, our chief foreign correspondent richard engel has returned once again to baghdad to give us a look at the conditions they will leave behind. this is part of our special coverage of "iraq: the long way out." >> reporter: on a base outside baghdad tonight, some american combat troops were bound for home, but what are they leaving, after seven and a half years of war? yesterday, we went to take a look. at 10:00 a.m., traffic was brisk in the ritzy al assad neighborhood. a new furniture store opened here four months ago. this sales clerk's family left iraq because of the violence and returned a year ago. do you think iraq is ready to stand on its own two feet? >> no, i don't. my opinion, we need u.s. troops. >> reporter: across the street, a new chrysler dealership is opened. how is business? >> it's very good. >> reporter: it's very good? >> yes. >> reporter: business is up 200% this year. the reason, the manager said, security has improved. this is haifa street. a few years ago, it was called the most dangerous street in the world. it was al qaeda's headquarters in baghdad. th
that could land him in prison. >>> plus, during this turning point for the u.s. in iraq, we visit one baghdad neighborhood to see if life there is any better. >>> national wonder. the biggest emerald ever found in the united states. for all >>> overseas stock markets are tumbling this morning, following a rough start to the week on wall street. investors are worried about more signs of slowing economic growth. the latest evidence is a report showing personal incomes rose the latest evidence is a report showing personal incomes rose less than expected last month. lower income generally leads to a decline in spending, which, of course, is essential to fuelling the recovery. >>> and looking at the boards this morning. tokyo's nikkei average plunged more than 3.5% today. hong kong's hang seng is lower. in london, the ftse opened sharply lower. and on wall street, the dow tumbled 141 points yesterday. the nasdaq, meanwhile, fell 33 points. >>> buying more fuel-efficient cars and trucks could soon be much easier. the government is proposing the first major overhaul to those window stickers in three
in prison. >>> plus, during this turning point for the u.s. in iraq, we visit one baghdad neighborhood to see if life there is any better. >>> national wonder. the biggest emerald ever found in the united states. for all the moments that make every day special. fancy feast created a way to celebrate any moment. fancy feast appetizers. simple high quality ingredients like wild alaskan salmon, white meat chicken, or seabass and shrimp in a delicate broth, prepared without by-products or fillers. fancy feast appetizers. celebrate the moment. when allergies make them itch, don't wait for your pills to kick in. choose alaway, from the eye health experts at bausch & lomb. it works in minutes and up to 12 hours. bausch & lomb alaway. because it's not just your allergies, it's your eyes. but my doctor told me that most calcium supplements... aren't absorbed properly unless taken with food. he recommended citracal. it's different -- it's calcium citrate, soit can be absorbed ith or without food. citracal. time to face the pollen that used to make me sneeze... my eyes water. but now zyrtec®, th
on the attack from margaret warner in baghdad. >> lehrer: then, judy woodruff examines president obama's role this week as the democrats' campaigner-in-chief. >> if you want to make your car go forward, what do you do? you put it in d. if you want to go backwards, what do you do? you put it in r. that's not an accident. >> ifill: we look at the administration's call for fundamental changes at mortgage giants fannie mae and freddie mac. >> lehrer: and a second mortgage story-- an encore paul solman report on homeowners who've stopped paying off their loans. >> ifill: plus, jeffrey brown talks to rosanne cash-- singer, songwriter, and daughter of country music legend johnny cash. >> any young person who is going into the same field... whose parents have been very successful, it's complicated. it was complicated for me. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> l
by the end of 2011. nbc's richard engel joins me live from baghdad. good sunday morning to you. >> reporter: good morning, alex. we are now on the outskirts of baghdad, at camp liberty, and we are embedded with members of the 42 stryker brigade, based in ft. lewis, go by the nickname the raiders. what's special about the troops they are the last u.s. combat troops in iraq and they will be leaving as all combat troops will be by the end of this month. but the question is, what kind of country will they be leaving behind? u.s. commanders say the iraqi security force ready to take over more responsibility. many iraqis aren't sure. there is still no stable government in place here. under question, what will happen to the -- what will happen in the future to a u.s.-created militia designed to fight al qaeda? that is just one of many what iraqis say are unresolved issues. in east baghdad a security dpoers creatforce created by the u.s. military patrols. checkpoints and inspecting cars and markets. these men are part of the militia that was the brainchild of general david petraeus. when petraeus c
/2 years. today, vice president biden arrived in baghdad. on wednesday, he'll preside over the change of command that will leave 50,000 u.s. troops in a support role. but we wondered what does all this mean for the ordinary people and their day-to-day life in iraq? dan harris, on his seventh trip there, decided to knock on some doors. >>> reporter: we chose the intersection of two small baghdad backstreets. let's start with this apartment building right here. in 2004, a huge car bomb went off. it was aimed at a church across the street, but it shattered the apartment building, with the hussein family inside. how's it going? nice to meet you. we went to their home and met their daughter, dima who was blinded in one eye and still needs more surgery. violence is way down since the bad days. at the height of the war, in september of 2006, 3,389 iraqi civilians were killed. this month, 270. which is why we saw some hopeful signs on these two blocks. like a new building going up here. this man named fadel recently opened a pickle shop. but there are serious problems with basic services. rig
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 783 (some duplicates have been removed)

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